salmon
salmon

Wild Salmon vs Farm Raised Salmon

Due to the scarcity of salmon, people have created farms specifically designed for salmon in order to meet the demand. This new breed of salmon is often referred to as “Farmed Salmon” or “Atlantic Salmon”. Prices between wild and farm-raised salmon can vary as much as 7 dollars per pound. Are these price differences justified? ¬†Here’s how it compares to wild salmon:

wild vs farmed salmon

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ClayoquotKidSalmon RanchingsalmonfarmscienceTony_SFO_YULsalmonfarmscience Recent comment authors
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ClayoquotKid
ClayoquotKid

While the idea of comparing two healthy and beneficial types of food with the intent of demonizing one to suit the “organic” fad is ridiculous in itself, there are a number of things here that are beyond absurd. Firstly, the type of salmon most commonly farmed is not a, “new breed”, it is Salmo salar – Atlantic Salmon. (Completely different species than Pacific Oncorhyncus, ie. Sockeye, Chinook, Coho, Pink, or Chum) That being said, the Salmo species is naturally much fattier than its Pacific counterparts – like comparing a beef steak to an elk steak. Going down the line there… Read more »

ClayoquotKid
ClayoquotKid

The most commonly farmed salmon is not a, “new breed” – it is Salmo salar, the Atlantic salmon. It is a different species than Pacific, or Oncorhyncus (ie. Sockeye, Chinook, Coho, Chum and Pink) Comparing any of the two types is like comparing a beef steak to one from an elk – they are different animals. To compare the differences in nutrient levels and fat content between farmed and wild salmon serves no purpose other than to villify the former in favour of the ideology of placing “wild” food above cultured – simply a choice based on your opinions, not… Read more »

Salmon Ranching
Salmon Ranching

Just wondering what two species of salmon were compared in your chart? There are 6 species of “wild-caught” salmon and more than 3 common “farm-raised” salmon.

salmonfarmscience
salmonfarmscience

The stats for the wild salmon in this graph are for wild Atlantic salmon, which are endangered. This graph is encouraging people to eat an endangered species.

Tony_SFO_YUL
Tony_SFO_YUL

I have changed my decision and I’ve decided to eat sustainable farmed salmon such as from Norway, or with the Monterey Bay Aquarium label. With all the contaminates in the oceans and rivers these days such as mercury and plastics, you are not eating a healthy wild salmon, in my opinion.

salmonfarmscience
salmonfarmscience

The stats for the wild salmon in this graph are for wild Atlantic salmon, which are endangered. This graph is encouraging people to eat an endangered species.

Salmon Ranching
Salmon Ranching

Just wondering what two species of salmon were compared in your chart? There are 6 species of “wild-caught” salmon and more than 3 common “farm-raised” salmon.

ClayoquotKid
ClayoquotKid

The most commonly farmed salmon is not a, “new breed” – it is Salmo salar, the Atlantic salmon. It is a different species than Pacific, or Oncorhyncus (ie. Sockeye, Chinook, Coho, Chum and Pink) Comparing any of the two types is like comparing a beef steak to one from an elk – they are different animals. To compare the differences in nutrient levels and fat content between farmed and wild salmon serves no purpose other than to villify the former in favour of the ideology of placing “wild” food above cultured – simply a choice based on your opinions, not… Read more »

ClayoquotKid
ClayoquotKid

While the idea of comparing two healthy and beneficial types of food with the intent of demonizing one to suit the “organic” fad is ridiculous in itself, there are a number of things here that are beyond absurd. Firstly, the type of salmon most commonly farmed is not a, “new breed”, it is Salmo salar – Atlantic Salmon. (Completely different species than Pacific Oncorhyncus, ie. Sockeye, Chinook, Coho, Pink, or Chum) That being said, the Salmo species is naturally much fattier than its Pacific counterparts – like comparing a beef steak to an elk steak. Going down the line there… Read more »